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  • Climate Action Week
    All day
    04-02-2019

    Events running throughout Week 4

    The Oxford Climate Society’s first-ever Climate Action Week will explore strategies for responding to climate change on as many fronts as possible, from lifestyle to legislation. Co-organised with the Student Union, Oxford Climate Justice Campaign, the Oxford Hub and Oxford Sustainability, and featuring collaborations with Oxford Migrant Solidarity, Waste Society and more. A week of lunchtime workshops and evening discussions. Events TBA – make sure to follow us on Facebook and subscribe to our newsletter! https://www.oxfordclimatesociety.com

  • Global Climate Change: A Summary for Policymakers
    14:00 -15:00
    04-02-2019

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    A lecture series by Professor Myles Allen (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford), co-hosted by the Oxford Geography Society and the Oxford Climate Society.

    Target audience: the aim is a course open to everyone. Human geographers and humanities students are very welcome: lectures will use GCSE-level maths only where essential (tools listed below), and exercises will require the use of an Excel-based integrated assessment climate model. Natural Sciences students may find it helpful to familiarise themselves with some basic macroeconomics, although I will try to work from first principles. No advanced reading is expected, but I recommend David Archer on the physical science, William Nordhaus on economics and David McKay on mitigation options, to be read alongside the lectures if you are interested.

    Lecture 4:
    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 and other climate drivers. This lecture explains why net anthropogenic CO2 emissions need to be reduced to zero to halt the rise in global temperature, putting paid to the once-popular idea of “contraction and convergence” to a “sustainable” per-capita CO2 emission rate. We’ll also discuss how other climate pollutants behave, including methane, nitrous oxide and aerosols, and why the concept of “CO2-equivalent emissions”, although deeply embedded in almost all climate policy discussions, can be misleading.

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  • Diabatic influences on Rossby wave development on the jet stream
    11:30 -12:30
    07-02-2019

    John Methven (University of Reading)

  • The role of scientific expertise in today’s world
    17:45 -19:00
    07-02-2019

    Linacre College, St. Cross Rd., Oxford

    Linacre College, St. Cross Rd., Oxford

    A Special Linacre Talk by Prof Harry Collins

    Abstract:

    In today’s world people have realized that the heroic episodes of science – Newton, Einstein, Quantum Theory, Gravitational Waves – do not represent most of the science we encounter in our lives – climate change, econometric modelling, old age. We can no longer rely on justifying the value of science by reaching for its truth and citing the old icons. Instead we must value science for its intrinsic values, which can survive and lead democracy as other professions fold under the pressure of the free market. Science is also a check and balance on the power of governments – a need which, with the growth of populism, has never been more clear. The social studies of science have to accept their role in the transformation of the image of science and consider their position.

    Bio:

    Professor Harry Collins is a British sociologist of science at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Wales. In 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the British Academy. He has written for over 30 years on the sociology of gravitational wave physics.

    Please RSVP to:

    samantha.vanderslott@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk or jack.rowbotham@chem.ox.ac.uk

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  • Global Climate Change: A Summary for Policymakers
    14:00 -15:00
    11-02-2019

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    A lecture series by Professor Myles Allen (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford), co-hosted by the Oxford Geography Society and the Oxford Climate Society.

    Target audience: the aim is a course open to everyone. Human geographers and humanities students are very welcome: lectures will use GCSE-level maths only where essential (tools listed below), and exercises will require the use of an Excel-based integrated assessment climate model. Natural Sciences students may find it helpful to familiarise themselves with some basic macroeconomics, although I will try to work from first principles. No advanced reading is expected, but I recommend David Archer on the physical science, William Nordhaus on economics and David McKay on mitigation options, to be read alongside the lectures if you are interested.

    Lecture 5:
    Global impact functions and the social cost of emissions. This lecture will explain how we assign a present monetary value to the future climate impacts of today’s greenhouse gas emissions, emphasising the importance of scenarios; equity and welfare; the notion of discounting future harms and benefits; bottom-up versus top-down, and model-based versus empirical, approaches to quantifying global economic impact; and dealing with uncertainty and risk. We’ll discuss the challenge of monetising irreversible impacts such as species extinction, including the (special?) case in which the species in question is Homo Sapiens.

  • Demystifying Climate Modelling
    19:15 -20:15
    11-02-2019

    Although Meteorological and Climate Modelling is a topic obviously crucial to the Climate Change debate, it is often challenging for non-atmospheric scientists to appreciate in any detail. Join our expert speakers, including Tim Palmer (Co-director, Oxford Martin Programme on Modelling and Predicting Climate), as we delve into how climate modelling actually works, and how climate models are then used to inform policies and decision-making.

    Part of the Oxford Climate Society Seminar series

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  • Neogene Geochemical Proxy Records: Implications for Future Sea Level Change
    12:00 -13:00
    15-02-2019

    South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3AN

    South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3AN

    Speaker: Prof Carrie Lear (Cardiff University )

  • Quo Vadis Nubibus?
    15:30 -17:00
    15-02-2019

    Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road OX1 3PU

    Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road OX1 3PU

    Professor Bjorn Stevens

    Clouds are funny things: ephemeral dispersions to which we attach great meaning and provide a wealth of interpretation. In climate science we are often forced to confront the question as to why clouds form, how they affect the climate system, and whether these effects can be constrained by some greater principle. Such questions are at the heart of many of climate science’s great unknowns, but also addressed to a sense of wonder that comes from looking to the sky. In entertaining these questions, I will explain why clouds on Earth are not special, but perhaps peculiar, how they interact with Earth’s climate system in unexpected ways, and strategies that are being developed — at great expense — to read reason from their randomness.

    About the speaker: Bjorn Stevens is a director at the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology where he leads the Atmosphere in the Earth System Department and is a professor at the University of Hamburg. Prior to moving to Hamburg he was a full professor of Dynamic Meteorology at the University of California of Los Angeles. His research blends modelling, theory and field work to help articulate the role of aerosols, clouds and atmospheric convection in the climate system. He has made pioneering contributions to both understanding and modelling of mixing and microphysical processes and their impact on the structure and organization of clouds. Likewise his contribution to an understanding of how clouds respond to warming, and how radiative forcing responds to aerosol perturbations, has proven fundamental to our present comprehension of the susceptibility of Earth’s climate to perturbations. In lay terms, his research has helped understand, and seeks to further understand, how clouds have changed, and will change, due to the presence of humans.

  • The tropical peat swamps of Southeast Asia – carbon, conflict and compromise
    16:15 -18:30
    15-02-2019

    SoGE, South Parks Road, Oxford

    SoGE, South Parks Road, Oxford

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  • Talk by Nigel Topping, CEO of the We Mean Business Coalition
    14:00 -15:00
    18-02-2019

    Old India Institute, Broad Street, Oxford

    Old India Institute, Broad Street, Oxford

    “Clearly, the role of business will be key if we are to transition to the zero-carbon economy envisaged in the Paris Agreement. The We Mean Business coalition was instrumental in bringing in the voice of progressive business to the multilateral process and continues to coordinate bold ambition, action and advocacy from global businesses acting on climate change. CEO Nigel Topping will explain how business engaged in the Paris process, the role of business in ratcheting and delivering climate ambition and his thoughts on the future role of business in delivering the transformative change needed.” [OCS]

    Part of the Oxford Climate Society Seminar series

  • Global Climate Change: A Summary for Policymakers
    14:00 -15:00
    18-02-2019

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    A lecture series by Professor Myles Allen (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford), co-hosted by the Oxford Geography Society and the Oxford Climate Society.

    Target audience: the aim is a course open to everyone. Human geographers and humanities students are very welcome: lectures will use GCSE-level maths only where essential (tools listed below), and exercises will require the use of an Excel-based integrated assessment climate model. Natural Sciences students may find it helpful to familiarise themselves with some basic macroeconomics, although I will try to work from first principles. No advanced reading is expected, but I recommend David Archer on the physical science, William Nordhaus on economics and David McKay on mitigation options, to be read alongside the lectures if you are interested.

    Lecture 6:
    The benefits, costs and challenges of emissions reductions. This lecture begins from the economic benefits of burning fossil carbon, and the consequent challenges of reducing emissions. We will look at global drivers of emissions in “shared socio-economic pathways”; compare marginal and total costs of different approaches to reducing emissions; and introduce you to cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis and the importance of non-monetary barriers and incentives.

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  • Global Climate Change: A Summary for Policymakers
    14:00 -15:00
    25-02-2019

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    A lecture series by Professor Myles Allen (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford), co-hosted by the Oxford Geography Society and the Oxford Climate Society.

    Target audience: the aim is a course open to everyone. Human geographers and humanities students are very welcome: lectures will use GCSE-level maths only where essential (tools listed below), and exercises will require the use of an Excel-based integrated assessment climate model. Natural Sciences students may find it helpful to familiarise themselves with some basic macroeconomics, although I will try to work from first principles. No advanced reading is expected, but I recommend David Archer on the physical science, William Nordhaus on economics and David McKay on mitigation options, to be read alongside the lectures if you are interested.

    Lecture 7:
    Climate policy options. We’ll begin from the current climate policy landscape and the status of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change following the Paris Agreement. We will discuss carbon pricing, cap-and-trade, cap-and-dividend and regulatory approaches to reducing emissions, and the ethical and practical challenges of relying on adaptation or remedial measures like albedo geo-engineering. Your lecturer has strongly-held and not-particularly-mainstream views on climate policy, so unlike lectures 1-6, this will not pretend to provide a balanced overview: you are invited to bring your own views along to provide balance.

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  • Can we limit global warming to 1.5°C, and how?
    18:00 -21:00
    27-02-2019

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    OUCE, SoGE, South Parks Road

    Speaker: Myles Allen (ECI, University of Oxford)

    Registration >>

    Abstract
    The IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C demonstrated that it is likely still geophysically possible to limit global warming to this very ambitious goal. Doing so, however, would require either immediate and unprecedented reductions in energy demand, relying on relatively novel technologies to dispose of massive amounts of carbon dioxide by some means other than dumping it into the atmosphere, or the geopolitical quagmire of solar geo-engineering. But as the grossly uneven impacts of climate change become ever clearer, the environmental and geopolitical risks of failure look greater than ever. On that cheerful note, I will argue that limiting warming to 1.5°C remains entirely feasible, and need not even be particularly disruptive – but it will require a complete rethink in the way we approach climate mitigation policy.

    Bio
    Myles Allen is Professor of Geosystem Science in the Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment and Department of Physics, University of Oxford. His research focuses on how human and natural influences on climate contribute to observed climate change and risks of extreme weather and in quantifying their implications for long-range climate forecasts. He was a Coordinating Lead Author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on 1.5 degrees, having previously served on the IPCC’s 3rd, 4th and 5th Assessments. In 2010 he was awarded the Appleton Medal and Prize from the Institute of Physics “for his important contributions to the detection and attribution of human influence on climate and quantifying uncertainty in climate predictions.”
    The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception.

  • There Is No Planet B
    19:00 -20:00
    27-02-2019

    Oriel College

    Oriel College

    Talk by Mike Berners-Lee

    Mike Berners-Lee is a leading expert on carbon emissions, founder of Small World Consulting and author of “How Bad Are Bananas? The Carbon Footprint of Everything” and “The Burning Question”. He is involved in sustainability research across many departments at Lancaster University and has worked on energy and emissions with a wide range of corporate and public sector organisations. His talk will be followed by a Q&A.

    Part of the Oxford Climate Society Seminar series

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