Calendar

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  • Let’s Talk About Climate: Let’s science the s*** out of this!
    10:00 -14:00
    05-10-2019

    Parks Road, Oxford

    Parks Road, Oxford

    Reduce our emissions? Store carbon dioxide? Or maybe just let the world burn? What’s the solution to the climate change conundrum? See whether we can chart a course to a zero-emissions world whilst other factors are at play – debate, calculate and see if you can help the experts solve this puzzle.

    This is the fourth in a series of six interactive workshops, in which participants will learn about the science of climate change, think about the how to solve the problem, and work out how to pass on their own message to influence decisions made at individual, local and national levels. You will get the chance to present your own message at the final Outreach Event.

    Find out more about the series >>

    For more information and to book a place please contact sarah.lloyd@oum.ox.ac.uk

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  • Is Neptune really an Ice Giant?
    11:30 -12:30
    10-10-2019

    Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Sherrington Rd, Oxford OX1 3PU

    Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Sherrington Rd, Oxford OX1 3PU

    Key speaker: Dr Nick Teanby (School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol)
    Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics Seminars

  • Is Neptune really an Ice Giant?
    11:30 -12:30
    10-10-2019

    Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Sherrington Rd, Oxford OX1 3PU

    Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Sherrington Rd, Oxford OX1 3PU

    Key speaker: Dr Nick Teanby (School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol)
    Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics Seminars

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  • Let’s Talk About Climate: Biodiversity is key
    10:00 -14:00
    12-10-2019

    Parks Road, Oxford

    Parks Road, Oxford

    Biodiversity and healthy ecosystems provide key services to humans, including mitigation (storing carbon) and protection from climate change impacts (eg. protect from flooding). Evidence shows that biodiverse ecosystems are the most resilient to climate change, and that resilient ecosystems can help us adapt to a rapidly changing climate. Design a creative campaign to get these evidence-based messages heard.

    This is the fifth in a series of six interactive workshops, in which participants will learn about the science of climate change, think about the how to solve the problem, and work out how to pass on their own message to influence decisions made at individual, local and national levels. You will get the chance to present your own message at the final Outreach Event.

    Find out more about the series >>

    For more information and to book a place please contact sarah.lloyd@oum.ox.ac.uk

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  • ML Approaches for Scientific Computing
    14:30 -15:30
    17-10-2019

    Speaker: Professor Peter Braam (University of Oxford)

    Machine Learning methodologies and tools have delivered new approaches to scientific computing ranging from new approximation methods to solve differential equations to leveraging advantages of ML hardware over traditional HPC hardware. It is not unlikely that such approaches will be helpful to computational problems that have seen little progress for decades. We will discuss a few examples, and discuss key themes in carrying this forward.

    Peter Braam is a scientist and entrepreneur focused on problems in large scale computing. Originally trained as a mathematician, he has worked at several academic institutions including Oxford, CMU and Cambridge. One of his startup companies developed the Lustre file system which is widely used. During the last few years he has focused on computing for the SKA telescope and on research in data intensive computing.

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  • Phytoplankton evolution driven by the impact of Earth’s orbital eccentricity on seasonality
    12:00 -13:00
    18-10-2019

    South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3AN

    South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3AN

    Key speaker: Prof. Luc Beaufort (CEREGE, France)

    Abstract
    The gephyrocapsids are a species complex that often dominate coccolithophore assemblages and calcification in the ocean. These unicellular phytoplankton are known to produce calcite plates of variable size for optimal adaptation to their environment. High-resolution (~2-3 kyr) records of coccolith size and mass measured in 12 tropical cores spanning up to 2.8 million years show regular and recurrent variations that follow the rhythms of the eccentricity of Earth’s orbit. This rhythmic pattern is different to records of long-term variation of global climate impacted largely by ice-volume. Instead, we posit that it reflects the amplitude of the low-latitude seasonal contrast under the direct influence of eccentricity. These seasonal dynamics of the ocean are masked in most paleoceanographic records of the last million years by the large variations of global ice volume and their influence on climate. However, similar pattern in the changes in amplitude of some climate proxies can be seen (d18Oatm, monsoon proxies, ocean productivity). These seasonal dynamics, although rarely documented, were strong enough to change the distribution of oceanic ecological niches in the ocean and thus drive coccolithophore evolution.

  • Climate science: the Met Office Hadley Centre perspective
    13:00 -14:00
    18-10-2019

    South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3AN

    South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3AN

    Keynote Speaker: Professor Albert Klein Tank

    Abstract:
    The Met Office Hadley Centre (MOHC) provides climate science and services to help people and organisations stay safe, well and prosperous.
    Since its foundation in 1990, MOHC research, focused around World Climate Research Programme priorities, is helping to answer some of the fundamental questions in climate science and pulls through the science to develop climate services and advice in support of government policy. Through our years of pioneering research, our scientists have been working alongside researchers from the UK and around the globe, with this partnership approach being crucial for success.
    This seminar will showcase some of the recent MOHC science highlights and also focus on the future looking at the changes in governmental and societal questions for climate science and services, the future role of climate modelling, the increasing need for partnerships, and the way we make the best use of new tools and technology, including AI and machine learning.

    Biography:
    Professor Albert Klein Tank is Director of the Met Office Hadley Centre. He has built an international reputation in climate science, particularly from his work in analyzing climate trends, developing observational datasets and producing the national climate change scenarios in the Netherlands. Albert now has responsibility for the strategic leadership of the Met Office Hadley Centre research. Albert leads the staff of the Met Office Hadley Centre. He represents the work of the Centre to the external scientific community and Government sponsors and he represents Climate Science within the wider Met Office Science programme as a member of the Science Management Team. He holds a Professorship in Climate Services at Wageningen University (the Netherlands). Before Albert joined the Met Office in February 2018, he has been based at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) for 25 years. He was head of the R&D department on Observations and Data Technology. Albert completed his PhD on the topic: “Changing temperature and precipitation extremes in Europe’s climate of the 20th Century” at Utrecht University (the Netherlands) in 2004. He has coordinated a number of EU science projects. Albert has been Coordinating Lead Author for the chapter on atmospheric observations in the IPCC-WGI Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC- AR5) published in 2013. He was a Lead Author in the IPCC-WGI Fourth Assessment Report published in 2007. He is co-chair of the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices of WMO-CCL, WCRP-CLIVAR and JCOMM.

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  • Climate effects of volcanic aerosol: past, present & future
    11:30 -12:30
    31-10-2019

    Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Sherrington Rd, Oxford OX1 3PU

    Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Sherrington Rd, Oxford OX1 3PU

    Key speaker: Dr Anja Schmidt (Uiversity of Cambridge)
    Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics Seminars

  • Talk from Dr David Nabarro
    17:00 -18:00
    31-10-2019

    Speaker: Prof David Nabarro (Imperial College London)

    Dr David Nabarro is Professor of Global Health at the Imperial College London and supports systems leadership for sustainable development through his Switzerland based social enterprise 4SD. Furthermore, he is Co-Facilitator for the Climate Action Summit in September 2019, Advisor at the Global Commission on Adaptation in Rotterdam, and curator of the Food Systems Dialogues.

    Register here>>

November
November